What Happens During Main Service Panel Inspections

main service panel inspections

A happy, homey household depends on its electrical system.

And a home’s electrical system highly relies on the functionality of its main electrical panel.

Unsafe electrical service panels greatly expose your whole family to unwanted dangers like fire and electrical shock. If you have an old or damaged electrical panel, call a licensed electrician immediately to inspect and diagnose the problem for you.

This article will discuss the things you need to know and expect during an electrical panel inspection.

What is the main service panel?

electrical panel

The main electrical service panel is responsible for every electrical activity on a property. It’s the switchboard that serves as the link between the external wires outside your home and the internal electrical wires of your household’s electrical system.

It receives the power from the utility company and distributes it to each circuit that supplies electricity to your lights and appliances.

Are Electrical Panels Included During a Home Inspection?

Generally, a home inspector can open an electrical panel as long as they can safely remove the cover of the panel. However, there are industry standards that do not require home inspectors to do this for safety reasons.

The two main certification organizations for home inspectors – the International Association of Certified Home Inspectors (NACHI) and the American Society of Home Inspectors – have their standards regarding this matter.

According to Section 3.7 of the NACHI Standards of Practice, inspecting “panelboards and overcurrent protection devices (circuit breakers and fuses)” is allowed during a home inspection.

However, as per the IV.C part, they are not required “to remove panelboard cabinet covers or dead fronts.”

On the other note, nowhere under the ASHI Electrical Standards of Practice prohibits a home electrical inspector to open a panel except on the prohibitions on Section 13. General Limitations and Exclusions:

“The inspector is not required to perform procedures or operations that will, in the professional judgment of the inspector, likely be dangerous to the inspector or other persons, or to damage the property or its systems or components.”

These are the only parts that a home inspector would check upon opening an electrical panel:

  • Service entrance connections
  • Main service disconnect breaker
  • Panelboard components (bus bar, neutral bar, grounding bar)
  • Breakers or fuses
  • Bonding
  • Branch wiring and wiring connections connected to the breakers or fuses

Things You Need To Expect During an Electrical Inspection:

The electrical panel must be installed and maintained correctly to allow the electricity to flow safely and efficiently.

Here’s a checklist of the things that an electrical panel inspector would check during an inspection:

  • Inspection of the electrical panel cover
  • Panel openings and labels
  • Proper circuit amperage
  • Ground Fault Circuit Interrupters (GFCI)
  • Arc Fault Circuit Interrupters (AFCI)
  • Wiring layout
  • Proper grounding

An inspection of the electrical panel box will allow you to know if your electrical system has the following problems:

  • Corrosion or oxidation of wiring
  • Insufficient clearance around the panel (with adherence to the 2008 National Electrical Code)
  • Water leakage
  • Pest damage
  • Aluminum branch wiring
  • Circuit breaker issues
  • Overheated or burned components

Book an Electrical Service Panel Inspection Now!

The safety of your home highly depends on your main service panel. It is potentially dangerous and needs careful attention and inspection.

If you see any signs of damage in your panel box, make sure to call a pro to inspect it for you.

Assurance Electrical Services in Prescott Valley in Arizona is here to cater to any types of electrical work with integrity and accountability.

Give us a call today to know more about our services!

Got any questions about the main service panels? Don’t hesitate to ask them out in the comments section below!

Jeff Brandlin

Jeff Brandlin

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